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Posted by on Jun 8, 2014 in Education | 0 comments

Dyslexia in our Community

Dyslexia in our Community

We are looking into what types of solutions we should offer as a community to help our community understand dyslexia. Dyslexia appears to be prevalent in our area. We need to help whānau understand what dyslexia is, how to watch out for signs of it, and that its not a bad thing – its just something that we need to think differently about, and do things a little differently for.

We are researching what might help us achieve this.

We would love to hear from an educational psychologist who might consider volunteering some of their time to screen and formally diagnose dyslexia for our primary aged children.

In September 2014 we supported some of our local teachers to attend a Davis dyslexia professional development course. They have come back to our community enthused about their learnings, and have now created a local network of professional teachers, from right across our various primary schools to lead the integration of proven teaching techniques that better enable learners with dyslexia. The network will share stories about what techniques have been working well in their classrooms, and how they plan to integrate more innovative teaching and learning pedagogy to engage all learners. Strategies to teach children with dyslexia often work wonders for the whole classroom.
Our next step is to start to empower whanau and families who may be challenged with dyslexia at the moment, through information. We will do this through our local media and social media; through regular filmed and written features that will ‘demystify dyslexia’. This is to help families who may be facing the challenge of initial diagnosis or who have some degree of dyslexia in their home and may not even know it. This is also to help whanau and families feel like they are not alone and there is information and help available. Too, it will showcase the positive efforts happening in our local primary schools. They will know where they can ask questions about dyslexia, how they can get involved and/or support the efforts of their schools, and hopefully feel more confident to help their own childs learning journey.

Our efforts to demystify dyslexia and learn more about what we can do as a community will, in the short, medium and long term increase the attainment of numeracy and literacy within our primary schools. Doing this collectively, across our schools, families and community will only accelerate our results, but most importantly will serve better our tamariki and their families, enabling their success in education as Ruapehu learners, and setting them up to achieve their potential.

Read more on Education Opportunities HERE .

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Posted by on Jun 7, 2014 in Employment | 0 comments

Local Skills Needs Analysis – Solution

Local Skills Needs Analysis – Solution

A local skills needs analysis will be undertaken to ascertain what the current and future skills and knowledge requirements are for local employment pathways and opportunities throughout Raetihi, Ohākune and Waiouru. This will inform local education and training to ensure learners have access to relevant knowledge and skills to increase the local workforce capacity. This integrated approach will also help to increase the confidence of locals to apply for, and attain local jobs.
This solution is related to the Work Broker solution, the Trades Training solution, and the Community Learning Centre solution.

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Posted by on Jun 7, 2014 in Education | 0 comments

Education – ECE Participation Rates

Education – ECE Participation Rates

Across the Ruapehu Rohe (Raetihi, Ohakune and Waiouru) there are 7 Early Childhood Education (ECE) providers.

As at the year of March 2012, Ruapehu Rohe had a prior participation rate (the proportion of new entrants who have participated in ECE before starting school) in ECE of 97.1%. This was a higher rate of participation than New Zealand (94.7%).

Maori participation rates in the Ruapehu Rohe, were up at 98%. This was higher than the national Maori participation rate of 90.3%. Pakeha participation rate in the Ruapehu Rohe was 96.2%, which is below the national rate of 97.9%. Relative to New Zealand, ECE participation in the Ruapehu Rohe is strong.

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